(mostly) daily photoblog

Posts tagged “Jakarta

Alive

Jak Photo Walk 12

This man was in one of the food markets in North Jakarta.  He was trying to maneuver his bike-cart out of the market so he could make a delivery.  As soon as he saw my camera, he turned from a serious businessman to a comedian.  He came alive for a few minutes when he became this entertainer.

Then, he needed to move on and get to work.  Mood came on and off like a switch.

 


Happy!

Jak Photo Walk 3

Everywhere I go in Indonesia, I find happy people.

 


What did we do before lcd screens on cameras?

Jak Photo Walk 1I love this photo.  The person on the left took a photo of the two men.  After taking the photo, she showed them the photo and they all gathered around her LCD screen to look at the photo that had just been taken.

When I first started taking photographs, I learned with a Pentax K1000 film SLR.  There was no instant feedback.  In fact, if I didn’t shoot an entire roll of film in a day, it could be a week or longer before I knew whether I had taken any good photos.  Now that we have instant feedback, we take a photo and then check to see how it turned out and often decide immediately whether it is worth keeping.

An unintended side effect, however, is that we gather around our cameras to see how good, or not good, we looked in the photo.  Community built on LCD screens?  Maybe.

 


Smoky

Jak Photo Walk 4

This man was really adamant that I take his photo.  He was also adamant that I take a photo of him smoking.   I think it turned out alright.

 


Jakarta Street Merchant

Jak Photo Walk 7

I completed my Master’s degree (the coursework) today, and went on a three hour photowalk with a Jakartan expat.  It was a great, tiring, overwhelming, amazing day.

This photo was one of more than two hundred shot today.  Looks like I’m back on the photoblog.


Photo Friday: My Environment

church

One of the many anomalies in Jakarta culture – a Catholic church in a Muslim country. This is what makes my environment so interesting.


How’d that get up there?

bike upstairs

I celebrated my 39th birthday today. My birthday gave me cause to contemplate my current context. I spent thirty-eight and a half years in Canada. Now that I live in Jakarta, my understanding of the lottery I unwittingly won by being born in North America has become so much better developed.

Take this photo, for instance. It is a “river” nearby to where I live, and that’s a “motorcycle” on the second floor balcony of an apartment that is adjacent to this river. This photo bothers me, and reminds me that I’ve had a pretty lucky existence.

There are many things in the photo that should bother the viewer…I’m wondering what bothers you.


The best back roads in Kemang

alley

I’m loving the motorcycle. It gets me to roads and places I’ve not been to before. This is an alley I have been down, but I’ve never come down it from this direction. Good times.


WordPress Photo Challenge: Love

love breakfast

We LOVE breakfast. Culturally speaking, “breakfast as dinner” is a strange concept. In Indonesia, a meal is not a meal until rice has been eaten. My students eat Nasi Goreng (fried rice) for every meal, it seems, and my idea of having certain foods only at certain times of the day is seen as strange.

This was my breakfast this morning – ham and egg muffins and a piece of grilled toast. The eggs are scrambled with a bit of milk and ham and dropped in muffin tins for about 17 minutes at 350 degrees. The toast is a piece of bread, buttered and grilled, as I still have not purchased a toaster here in Jakarta. Probably never will, either.

My love? Breakfast.


Photo Friday: Serene

water temple

Water: so devastating and so peaceful.

This is the water temple in Bali called Tanah Lot. It is located on the Indian ocean and it is beautiful. The sound of the waves coming in is nearly hypnotic. The Hindus in the area were celebrating a full moon when we were there and they walked quietly through the water to get to the temple to make their offerings. So serene.

On the other side, the side of devastation, my city of Jakarta is still underwater. We got news today that a Kampung (village) in East Jakarta where my wife visited only last Saturday is now entirely underwater. The inhabitants had to evacuate without anything they owned, which was not much to start.

Please pray for the people of Jakarta, that they will find serenity soon.


This may be the best place to sleep in Jakarta right now

boat

This is not the best photo I’ve taken. This is not a photo I took recently. This is a statement about the city in which I live, my city, Jakarta.

We are experiencing a particularly bad rainy season this year…although I have nothing to which I could compare it as I’ve only been here six months. Today, it flooded so badly in Jakarta that the city’s government and the nation’s government have declared the highest level of flood threat.

My school has been shut down for tomorrow in light of the distance that many of our students drive each morning to attend takes them right through massively flooded areas. My wife spent seven hours…seven hours…in a car trying to get from where we live to North Jakarta and back. Halfway there, the flooding was so bad that kids in rafts were floating past her car on the toll road. Our school’s driver decided to turn around and it took him three and a half hours to get back.

There are thousands, tens of thousands, probably hundreds of thousands (it is a city of 20-some million people) of people are out of their homes tonight because there is too much water in their homes. There are homes that have been erased by this flood. There are, reportedly, people who have died in this flood.

The boat, above, is maybe the best place for many people tonight because it’s on top of the water, not under it.


Graffiti…better?

better

One of our many examples of graffiti here in the Kemang area of South Jakarta.

I went for a ride on Saturday and found many more examples of what’s happening around here in street art. There’s some crap, some territorial scrawlings, but there’s also some really beautiful, really well-done art.

I’ll let you decide into which category this falls.


A little architecture, a little graffiti

graffiti hotel

A little bit of both. This is on the corner where Kemang Raya, the main street in our neighborhood, breaks off into two one-way streets. The graffiti, as you’ve seen in the last few days, is in the wreck of a former building. Adjacent to the old building is an old hotel. It sticks out because it is one of the taller buildings in this part of Kemang.


Error…

error

I’m trying to think of something witty or poignant to say about this,but nothing’s coming to mind. All I can think about is that I didn’t sleep well last night and now I’m so tired that I’m lucky that breathing is a reflex.


A window on art

graffiti window

This is another shot from Saturday morning’s bike ride around Kemang. I like how what used to be a building frames the art that’s growing up around the area. I will say this, though: there is little more difficult than trying to figure out which horizontal line in this photo should be straight. One of the rules of a good photo is that the horizon should be straight. The problem with this photo is that there are a couple too many horizons.

I still liked it enough to post it.

How about you?


WordPress Photo Challenge: Resolved

graffiti masjid

I resolved to get to know my city a bit better.  I bought a motorcycle in the early days of December, and, now that it’s finally licensed, I’ve been driving it around my neighborhood.  I bought it so that I could get to and from work more easily, but it’s offered so much more than a commuter vehicle ever could.

Jakarta is an immeasurably large city.  There are five areas, as far as I can tell, that actually make up the city of Jakarta:  South (where I live), North, East, West, and Central.  Then there are all the other towns, villages, cities that have been absorbed by the greater Jakarta area.  On top of that, the council of people who plan out how the city develops seems to be non-existent.  Streets start and stop, lead to suicidal corners and dead-ends, narrow to daredevil dimensions.  If rhyme and reason play any part, they are a funeral dirge to the hopes of newcomers wishing to get to know their new city.

Add to all of that the “macet” (literally translated as “jammed” – referring to Jak’s horrible traffic), and buying a car was out of the question.  So I bought a motorcycle.  What’s great is that, in the three or four days of driving it around my neighborhood, I’ve already scouted a number of places I had no idea existed.

What you see above is an example of one of those places.  I particularly love the juxtaposition of the mosque and the graffiti.


She’s been watching me

she

I’ve found some new-found freedom here in the Big Jak.  I’ve been driving my motorcycle a lot this week, now that I finally have licence plates for it, and it’s given me some ability to get around and snap photos that I’ve not had the opportunity to take.

This girl, painted on a wall at a corner on a one-way section of Jalan Kemang Raya, watches me every time I go by her.  Today, I got out and took her picture.  I like her headband-ears.

Now that I’ve got mobility, I think it’s time to find some more street art.


WordPress Photo Challenge: 2012 (in hindsight)

This year has been momentous.  I have watched as my family and I have adapted to our move from Chilliwack, British Columbia, Canada, to Jakarta, Indonesia.  I moved from teaching in a public school to an international, private school.  I moved from one of the most beautiful places in the world (nah…it is the most beautiful) to a place I haven’t figured out yet.  I moved from mountains and rivers to busy streets and overpopulation.  I moved from ease and comfort (with a bit of financial challenge) to a place of challenge.

2012…the year of the move.


WordPress Photo Challenge: Surprise!

bmb

I love when I’m shooting and I find that, to my surprise, my candid photo has turned into a posed photo.

We were sitting in the Soekarno-Hatta Airport in Jakarta, waiting to leave on our Christmas trip to Bali and I was taking some photos.  I thought I had Ben without his knowing it, and then he turned to look right up my lens as I shot this.  Ha!  My son cracks me up.


The journey (to the pool)…

kcv…begins with a step down this path.

We’re going to Bali tomorrow, and I’ve got a big, whanging headache.  I’ll try to write something more poignant and witty tomorrow.  We’ll see.

 


The brain-case

nolan

I am somewhere around 188cm tall, and just over 100kg.  This makes me huge by Indonesian standards.  Everyone is so much smaller than me.  I particularly enjoy my experiences shopping here.  I’ve asked the salespeople if they have shirts for guys my size, or pants for my size, and I get total honesty.  No run-around at all.

“Do you have a shirt my size?”

“No.”

No checking in the back.  No asking around.  No looking on other racks.  They know that I am an anomaly.

So when I bought my motorcycle and the salesman delivered it with a helmet, I was cautious in my optimism.  It turned out that the biggest helmet they had sits quite a way above my head, not so much on it.  I had to do some hunting, but the helmet that you see above not only fits, it fits well.  It was more expensive than some, less expensive than many.  I tried on twenty helmets, and this one did not leave me gasping for air, claustrophobic, or feeling like I was going to tear my own ears off trying to remove it.


The Germans

Bundesrepublik

The Kemang area of South Jakarta (Jakarta Selatan) is home to many interesting inhabitants of varying importance.  This is the home of   a German diplomat.  I don’t know who lives here, but there’s more security cameras on this residence than most around here, and a conspicuous absence of security guards.

Hmm…suspicious?


Haha! Expectations.

ineffective

Often, people around here will make jokes about how, if you wanted to, you could not get the attention of the police if you really needed them.  Maybe this is why the expectations of Jakartans are not that high.


Walk a mile…

shoes

…in someone else’s shoes.  In this case, the shoes belong to a man who scavenges for a living.  I pass men, women, and children who scavenge to live every morning as I head to school.  They work their way through the trash of Kemang residences, looking for things that will bring them income.

Walk a mile in this pair of shoes.  I doubt I would make it through a day.


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